Microsoft is reportedly giving up on the core technology in its Edge browser for Windows 10 and will rely instead on Google’s browser software.

The new browser is codenamed Anaheim and will use software from Chromium, Google’s open-source project on which Chrome is based, Windows Central reported Monday. Specifically, it’ll use Google’s Blink, the browser engine with the key job of interpreting website coding and displaying it on your screen, the report said. An announcement about the plans could come this week, the Verge reported.

Microsoft declined to comment. However, one source familiar with the company’s plans confirmed that Microsoft indeed plans to package its own browser software around a Chromium core.

If the move indeed comes to pass, it’ll make life easier for web developers who won’t have to bother testing their software with as many browsers. But the flip side of that coin is that it means the web becomes less an independent technology platform and more whatever Google’s Chrome programmers say it is. Ten years after it was first introduced publicly, Chrome dominates the web.

The web already lost a major independent browser engine when Opera mostly killed its own Presto in 2013, ultimately moving to Chrome’s technology. There are still two browser forces independent from Chrome: Mozilla’s Firefox, which uses the Gecko browser engine, and Apple’s Safari, which uses WebKit.